We love fresh ginger. That’s why we write about it so much in our weekly newsletter. But newsletters get forgotten and deleted. That’s why we’ve included our favorite ginger-related newsletter blurbs in one blog post. 

Besides adding a delightful pungency to dishes, ginger eases digestive upset, particularly nausea, intestinal gas and motion sickness.  Plus, it contains special anti-inflammatory phytonutrients known as gingerols.  

In a recent study, a microbiologist found small particles in ginger root to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria and improve colitis in mice.

Plus, animal studies suggest that ginger strengthens the immune system. Yes, please. 

How to Peel Ginger

Ginger’s craggy edges and lumpy shape don’t make it the most inviting spice to cut and peel, especially on lazy days. But it need not be that way!  Instead of using a knife or vegetable peeler to peel ginger, use the edge of a spoon to peel away the skin. Despite its looks, the skin of ginger is surprisingly soft and comes off easily.  Plus, your fingers are safe from knife slips and you end up with more usable ginger. 

And as a bonus, everything above applies to Turmeric, a ginger relative that has powerful anti-inflammatory benefits. Though you may end up with some orange fingers!

How to Keep Ginger Fresh

Tired of finding rotting knobs of ginger in your fridge? Yeah, us too. Fortunately, there’s a solution. 

Wrap fresh ginger tightly in plastic wrap and store in your freezer. You can peel and grate frozen ginger and return the unused part to the freezer until the next time. 

Favorite Ginger Recipes

• Homemade ginger tea is one of the most soothing ways to add ginger to your diet. 

Add 1” of fresh, peeled, sliced ginger to a mug of boiling water and let steep for 5-10 minutes.  Optionally, add a squirt of lime and a drizzle of honey. Stir and enjoy its soothing effect! If the ginger tastes too strong then start with less and work your way up to the full inch.  

Boost its healing effects by adding turmeric. Scott relies on a cup of ginger and turmeric tea to settle his gut on bad days. 

Bertina’s chicken congee with ginger is Scott’s go-to meal after a colonoscopy because it’s soothing, gut-friendly and simply delicious.

Ginger-Scallion Chicken takes less time to prepare than waiting for delivery. 

 What’s your favorite way to eat ginger? 

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